Rapid evolution of a native species following invasion by a congener

Citation:

Y.E. Stuart, T. S. Campbell, P. A. Hohenlohe, R. G. Reynolds, L. J. Revell, and J. B. Losos. 2014. “Rapid evolution of a native species following invasion by a congener.” ScienceScienceScience, 346, Pp. 463-6.
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Abstract:

In recent years, biologists have increasingly recognized that evolutionary change can occur rapidly when natural selection is strong; thus, real-time studies of evolution can be used to test classic evolutionary hypotheses directly. One such hypothesis is that negative interactions between closely related species can drive phenotypic divergence. Such divergence is thought to be ubiquitous, though well-documented cases are surprisingly rare. On small islands in Florida, we found that the lizard Anolis carolinensis moved to higher perches following invasion by Anolis sagrei and, in response, adaptively evolved larger toepads after only 20 generations. These results illustrate that interspecific interactions between closely related species can drive evolutionary change on observable time scales.

Notes:

Stuart, Y ECampbell, T SHohenlohe, P AReynolds, R GRevell, L JLosos, J BengP30GM103324/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/Research Support, N.I.H., ExtramuralResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tResearch Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.New York, N.Y.2014/10/25 06:00Science. 2014 Oct 24;346(6208):463-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1257008.

Last updated on 08/16/2016